The Problem of Aging Hair - AND PRODUCT SOLUTIONS

When I’m working with clients with thinning hair, ultimately one of the most key conversations we have is about how difficult their hair is to style. They’ll use words and phrases like "frizzy" or challenging, complaining that “it won’t cooperate." or it’s hard to style even before they understand that they are dealing with hair loss or aging hair.

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In many post-menopausal women, we see a “miniaturization" of the hair, meaning the hair becomes smaller in diameter.

The smaller diameter of each individual hair causes hair to become frizzy, stubborn, hard to style, and just plain thin. Believe it or not, the miniaturization of air can be found even in women in their twenties, and even teens. People are often confused by this challenging new hair

People often seem confused by this challenging new hair, the frizz, when their hair used to be substantially smoother. Why is it so hard to style? It’s simply a feature of miniaturization. The good news is, there are ways to deal with it.

The tendency of most is to heat style it more, maybe by using a flat iron on those stubborn hairs to smooth them out. BUT that actually makes it worse. Sorry, but it's true. Heat styling causes more breakage and more hair loss. No amount of blow drying or hot irons will fix that frizz. I’m not saying that you can’t use your favorite hair tools to get the look you want, but styling hair and repairing hair are totally separate things. And to fix and repair... well, you'll need some new game plays.

To understand how to repair your hair, let's first take a look at something called the Ludwig Scale of Hair Loss.

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There are Three Grades as part of the Scale. In Grade III, you will notice there is a lot of “scarring” (aka baldness). A client who is experiencing Grade III hair loss is a perfect candidate for a topper. Don’t knock wigs or toppers. There is a time.

Many of women in Grade II are still able to work with styling and root concealers and feel covered. Grade II women will find that the area you notice (pictured) that is most thinning is the most challenging and now you know why. If left untreated and without a good maintenance plan Grade I can quickly go to Grade II.

Enter gentle hair care.

The first thing you need to do is find products that will work to change the hair shaft. These products should repair the cuticle and cortex and create a stronger hair shaft from the root. 

For styling I use: Rene Furterer Lissea Thermal Protecting Spray

This lightweight product is great for the finest of hairs. I use it on ALL of my clients before I blow dry them to provide shine and heat protection up to 428 degrees. 

For maintenance I use: Rene Furterer RF 80.
This weekly dose of meds for your hair - it works against hair loss to naturally encourage the growth of stronger hair as well as improve the structure of the hair for faster growth.

Add Olaplex to your monthly routine. This is a cuticle fix. For technical hair junkies, that means that it multiplies the bonds of hair. For non-hair junkies, that means it makes the cuticle stronger, AKA less prone to damage and breakage. 

Do these things and you will be able to manage heat styling and take good care of your hair.

 
 

Finally, here’s the key list to help you, especially if you know your hair is thinning and you’re worried about going from Grade I to II:

  • Avoid heat, air dry as much as possible until your have to use the blow dryer.
  • No flat irons. If you are addicted to heat styling you need to use heat styling products. Here are my tried and true favorites.
  • No relaxers or harsh straighteners. Damage city!
  • Even hair dye can cause damage, avoid it if you can. I hate it, because right now in my life it is a necessary evil.
  • Wash your hair well, clean your scalp. Great hair grows from a healthy scalp.
  • Sleep on satin to help with the tossing and turning at night.
  • Use a good quality comb.

Tell your hair you love it and you are there for it no matter what “grade” you are!

XOXO,

Christine